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Canadian Ombudsperson urges firms to report production at each level

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The Canadian Ombudsperson for Responsible Enterprise (CORE) has made key recommendations that could enable Canadian garment companies to fight against child labour more effectively. Recommendations include using regulatory power under Bill S-211 to require Canadian government institutions and businesses to report on each level of production.

Firms have been urged to review the report closely as they prepare for Bill S-211 to come into force. The CORE will engage with parliamentarians to advocate for enhanced transparency measures, according to its report titled ‘Respect for Child Rights and the Risk of Child Labour in the Global Operations and Supply Chains of Canadian Garment Companies’.

The Canadian Ombudsperson for Responsible Enterprise (CORE) has made key recommendations that could enable Canadian garment companies to fight against child labour more effectively. Recommendations include using regulatory power under Bill S-211 to require Canadian government institutions and businesses to report on each level of production.

The second recommendation is adopting mandatory human rights and environmental due diligence legislation to address human rights risks, including child labour, throughout the supply chain. The CORE will engage with parliamentarians and government stakeholders to urge the adoption of mHREDD.

The third recommendation is including reporting standards beyond garment production, or tier one of a company’s supply chain(s), within the due diligence reporting standard proposed under Canada’s Responsible Business Conduct Abroad: Canada’s Strategy for the Future (RBC Strategy). The CORE will recommend that the Canadian General Standards Board Committee on RBC Due Diligence for Canadian Companies Active Abroad includes such reporting standards.

The fourth recommendation is that Canadian garment companies develop effective child labour remediation mechanisms that go beyond terminating supplier relationships as a last resort. The CORE will engage relevant experts to develop practical, sector-specific guidance on effective child labour remediation.

The fifth recommendation is that Canadian garment companies strengthen their understanding of responsible business conduct key concepts, including child rights and child labour. The CORE will work with industry, government, and civil society to provide webinars, workshops, and/or roundtables to increase awareness and knowledge of responsible business conduct key concepts.

Bill S-211 enacts the Fighting Against Forced Labour and Child Labour in Supply Chains Act, which imposes an obligation on certain government institutions and private-sector entities to report on the measures taken to prevent and reduce the risk that forced labour or child labour is used by them or in their supply chains.

Fibre2Fashion News Desk (NB)


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